Law Enforcement News

Vol. XXIX, No. 603 A publication of John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY July 31, 2003

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In this issue:

Around The Nation: A coast-to-coast roundup of police news.
Gimme a brake! Problems with Dodge cruisers.
Equal opportunity: Women are drawn to bounty hunting.
Palm pilot test: Digital fingerprinting heads to the field.
Bum rap: Why some criticize red-light crackdown.
Cuff-links: Study prompts Las Vegas use-of-force changes.
The great unveiling: Muslim woman loses suit over license photo.
People & Places: Moose moves on; funny papers; the music man; coming out; going hog wild; blue parade for charity; boilover in Benton Harbor.
Solo artist: “Officer Charlie,” the Savannah P.D.’s one-man homeless outreach unit.
Good news, bad news: Preliminary UCR has both.
Playing tag: Micro-engraving may help ID bullets.
Say what? Supreme Court hedges its bets in new Miranda ruling.
Home opener: Washington cops train as emergency foster parents.
Mopping up crime: Market niche opens for crime -scene cleanup firms.
Forum: Mueller talks turkey with the ACLU.
Double whammy: Detroit PD agrees to two consent decrees.
Criminal Justice Library: A new study in black & white.
The way things seem: In Tampa, don’t even look like a drug dealer.
The smell of success: A dose of skunk odor chases LA criminals.

 
 People & Places

Time to move on

     Faced with the choice of giving up his book project or remaining head of the Montgomery County, Md., Police Chief Charles Moose resigned last month, saying it was time to “move on and explore other paths in life.”

     The 49-year-old chief ran afoul of the county’s ethics board in March. The panel, which regulates the jurisdiction’s law on employees’ outside work, had ruled that as a county employee, Moose could not profit from a book he was writing about the Washington-area sniper case. It also barred Moose from acting as a consultant on a television movie about it...

Music man

     In just five years, Hillsborough County, Fla., Deputy Sheriff Brian Alexander has gone from singing at agency functions to thrilling 15,000 people at Tropicana Field with his rendition of the national anthem.

     The 48-year-old Alexander, a community service officer and member of the agency’s hostage negotiation team, has no formal musical training. He does have perfect pitch, however. Alexander honed his skills singing in the church choir, with a high school barbershop quartet and just around the house. At Christmas time, he has confessed to singing loudly to “O Holy Night” and “Amazing Grace” as he cleans...

Coming out

     While Suisun City, Calif., Police Chief Ron Forsythe and his partner will no longer have to leave the county when they wish to go out together, not much else has happened since Forsythe’s announcement in December that he was gay.

     “I would describe residents as quietly tolerant,” Forsythe told The Fairfield Daily Republic. “But I don’t think Solano County is ready for a gay pride parade.” ...

Hog wild

     Give Meadows Place, Texas, Police Chief Mike Pickett a pig as a gift and, far from being offended, the lawman will probably be touched. That’s because Pickett is an avid collector of piggie paraphernalia, a regular hog when it comes to porcine effigies in ceramic, wood or any other material.

     The collecting bug bit him when he first entered law enforcement in the 1970s. Someone gave him the game “Pigmania” as a joke. Since then, his collection has grown so large that he began sharing it with the Sugar Land branch of the Fort Bend Library in May...

The blue parade

     It was a police lineup with a difference last month in Virginia Beach, Va., when more than a dozen of the city’s finest put themselves on display — some of them topless — for a roomful of women eager to bid on their company for an evening.

     The event, called the Blue Knight Auction, exceeded organizers’ expectations by raising $5,300 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society’s Team in Training, an endurance training program that raises money to help cancer patients...