Law Enforcement News

Vol. XXXI, No. 635 A publication of John Jay College of Criminal Justice/CUNY August 2005

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In this issue:

Around The Nation: A coast-to-coast roundup of police news.
High-risk patrol: New dangers seen in bike patrol.
Missing? How to get NCIC on the case.
Try, try again: Seeking better handling of domestic violence.
Blown away: Breath-testing device under fire in Mississippi.
On retainer: Prosecutorís office find good help is hard to keep.
Monkey business: False news report haunts Mesa SWAT team.
Donít touch that dial: Police presence expands on cable TV.
People & Places: Time to move on; life of Bryan; NYCís new watchdog; a copís comeback; building a future; a lot of crust; unjust dessert; family first.
Numbers donít add up: W. Va. has problems with racial profiling data.
Decisions, decisions: Courts have their say on a variety of issues.
Criminal Justice Library: Crimeís roots as a family matter; lessons for living.
Forum: 21st-century crime-fighting, with help from the ATF.
At long last NIBRS: New use seen for incident-based data.
Setting the pace: Violent crime declines in NYC & elsewhere.

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 Forum

Cramer:
Catching bad guys in the 21st century

     In a quiet neighborhood somewhere near Miami, a man and his son are murdered while they sleep. Their home is ransacked and robbed. When Miami-Dade police arrive at the scene, the killer is gone, but the shell casings from his .22-caliber weapon are not. They lie on the floor near the victims, and police carefully collect each one.

     Technicians at the Miami-Dade Police Crime Laboratory enter, or ďimage,Ē the shell casings into a ballistics imaging system provided by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF). The system creates digital images of the shell casings, including the specific markings (microscopic scratches and dents) left on them by the shooterís weapon....