Lloyd Sealy Library
John Jay College of Criminal Justice
Lloyd Sealy Library

Lloyd Sealy Library

John Jay College of Criminal Justice

Library News Blog

Marta Bladek published “Student well-being matters: Academic library support for the whole student” in The Journal of Academic Librarianship (47.3) and “Students and parents: How academic libraries serve a growing population” in Library Trends (70.2).

Kathleen Collins was a writer-in-residence for two weeks at the Monastery of St. Gertrude in Cottonwood, Idaho during her Fall 2021 sabbatical and shares her experience in “Big Monastery on the Prairie” at katcoindustries.com/scholastica. Her short story, “Footprint Zero,” was published in the Spring issue of A Plate of Pandemic. She continues to produce Indoor Voices podcast, which she co-founded in 2017, and published the 71st episode in March 2022.

Jeffrey Kroessler published “The Word on Wilding” in the Spring 2022 issue of Academic Questions. The November 18, 2021 issue of The New York Review of Books featured an essay about his recent book, Sunnyside Gardens: Planning and Preservation in a Historic Garden Suburb. In March he gave a talk at the AIA’s Center for Architecture about the book.

 

Read more from the Spring 2022 issue of Classified Information, the Library's newsletter

 


Posted Monday, April 25, 2022 - 2:07pm


image of a desk and laptopA startling bit of news came out of Bard College recently. The library newsletter announced, proudly, one assumes: “In keeping with campus-wide initiatives to ensure that Bard is a place of inclusion, equity, and diversity, the Stevenson Library is conducting a diversity audit of the entire print collection in an effort to begin the process of decanonizing the stacks. Three students, who are funded through the Office of Inclusive Excellence, have begun the process which we expect will take at least a year to complete. The students will be evaluating each book for representations of race/ethnicity, gender, religion, and ability.

            Bard quickly stepped back in the face of sharp public criticism. The chief librarian assured all that no books would actually be removed. But, she explained, the exercise “will help us understand and answer questions about representation in our collections and build a more inclusive collection going forward.” How odd, that a librarian would consider her collection as less than inclusive. Had she been intentionally building a collection based on exclusion? She is certainly suggesting that in the future Bard will not be putting on the shelves books whose ideas or authors they find objectionable.

            We should ponder what Justice Louis Brandeis wrote in Whitney v. California (1927): “If there be time to expose the falsehood and fallacies, to avert the evil by the process of education, the remedy to be applied is more speech, not enforced silence.” Removing books from the stacks or not buying books expressing difficult ideas is “enforced silence.”

            The Lloyd Sealy Library will not be “decanonizing” our collection. Indeed, that concept is antithetical to our core mission. It also violates the American Library Association’s Library Bill of Rights, a document adopted in 1939 as the rise of totalitarianism threatened liberal society. The first two articles are germane here.

            Article I: Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest,  information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation.

            Article II: Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.

            Those principles guide our collection development policies and practices. Yes, we are constantly weeding our collection to make way for new volumes, but we do not remove any books because we find the ideas or the author objectionable. Really, it is my hope that everyone finds something in our collection they find objectionable. At the same time, we do our best to respond to requests that we acquire a particular volume, for that, too, is part of our core mission – supporting the educational and research needs of faculty and students.

            Delivering a commencement address at Dartmouth College in June 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower implored his audience, “Don’t join the book burners. Don’t think you’re going to conceal faults by concealing evidence that they ever existed. Don’t be afraid to go in your library and read every book.”

            Amen to that.

Jeffrey Kroessler, Interim Chief Librarian

Read more from the Spring 2022 issue of Classified Information, the Library's newsletter

 


Posted Monday, April 25, 2022 - 1:33pm


Books on Library Shelf

The Lloyd Sealy Library’s physical space will be open to current John Jay and CUNY students, faculty, and staff starting on Friday 1/28/22. Our remote services will continue as well. 

In line with COVID-19 mitigation guidelines, please see details below:

Access to the physical library:

At present, only current CUNY students, faculty, and staff who are in compliance with CUNY’s COVID-19 mitigation protocol are able to visit the Library. 

 

Visitors (including outside researchers and alumni) must follow the campus access protocol. The special collections room will remain closed. Researchers may inquire about a virtual consultation with the special collections librarian by contacting libspcoll@jjay.cuny.edu 

Library hours:

Please refer to the Library’s calendar for details.

Mask mandate:

Everyone must wear a face mask at all times while in the library, per CUNY guidelines.

Available services for students:

  • Circulating books and reserves.
  • Computer workstations (library computers are not equipped with headphones or microphones)
  • Silent study areas
  • Study spaces for students with their own devices.
  • Printing and scanning.
  • Study rooms will be capped to 2 people at a time.
  • In-person research assistance on the upper level of the library.
  • Remote research help through chat, email, Zoom, and phone.
  • Interlibrary loan (ILL), please refer to our ILL policy for details.

Available services for faculty:

  • In-person research assistance on the upper level of the library.
  • Remote research help through chat, email, Zoom and phone.
  • Library instruction.
  • Reserves.
  • Interlibrary loan (ILL), please refer to ILL our policy for details.

Posted Thursday, January 27, 2022 - 11:28am


Zoom Icon

For Fall 2021, the Library is expanding its virtual reference assistance. Now, in addition to chat and email students are welcome to consult with librarians live on Zoom.
 
The Zoom drop-ins are equivalent to our face-to-face reference service that provides assistance with forming a research topic and search strategy, finding and accessing sources, and solving any research-related problems.
 
Some of the queries librarians address include the following:
 
*How do I get started with my project?
*What are the keywords I need to get good articles?
*Where should I go to find sources for my paper?
 
Checking in with a librarian, as students often observe, makes research more doable and saves lots of time and frustration. In the remote environment, getting library assistance via Zoom additionally provides guidance in doing research in a context where print sources are not available.
 

We are looking forward to seeing you on Zoom.


Posted Thursday, October 21, 2021 - 10:58am


Library books on shelves

The Lloyd Sealy Library’s physical space will be open to current John Jay students, faculty, and staff starting on Wednesday 8/25/21. Our remote services will continue as well. 

In line with COVID-19 mitigation guidelines, please see details below:

 

Access to the physical library:

At present,  current John Jay students, faculty, and staff are able to visit the Library if the comply with CUNY COVID-19 protocols. Please see more information on campus access.

Other CUNY patrons are allowed as well, as long as they comply with CUNY COVID-19 protocols. Please see more information on campus access.

The Library is not open to outside researchers. 

 

Library hours:

Please refer to our calendar for details.

 

Occupancy limits and social distancing:

The Library will monitor the level of occupancy to prevent overcrowding. In line with social distancing guidelines, limited computer workstations, study carrels and seats are available on a first-come/first-serve basis.  

 

Mask mandate:

Everyone must wear a face mask at all times while in the library, per CUNY policy.

 

Available services for students:

  • Circulating books and reserves. 
  • Limited number of computer workstations (library computers are not equipped with headphones or microphones).
  • Silent study areas.
  • Study spaces for students with their own devices. 
  • Printing and scanning.
  • Study rooms will be capped to 2 people at a time.
  • Zoom library workshops
  • In-person research assistance on the upper level of the library.
  • Remote research help through chat, email, and phone.
  • Interlibrary loan (ILL), please refer to our ILL policy for details.

 

Available services for faculty:

 


Posted Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 1:13pm


 
The Library is proud to announce that 18 of our reserve lab computers can now be accessed through the John Jay IT department’s remote access dashboard: https://remoteaccess.labstats.com/CUNY-JJAY-GeneralUseLabs#computer-group_1022. These remotely available library computers (labeled as LIBLAB##) are equipped with specialized software normally accessible on campus only, including:
 
  • Microsoft Office Suite 
  • Adobe CC Suite (including Adobe Acrobat Professional)
  • ArcGIS 
  • SAS 
  • IBM SPSS 
  • Visual Studio 
  • R Statistics Software
  • Maple 
  • Mathematica
 
To take advantage of this service, all you need is a laptop device with the remote access client installed on it. Instructions on how to configure your laptop to gain access:
 
 
If you need assistance with one of the library reserve lab computers, our lab assistants will be able to provide support through the use of email. Contact us at librarylabsupport@jjay.cuny.edu. Unfortunately, due to budget constraints, we will only be able to offer email support for a limited number of hours each day. 
 
On top of the 18 computers from the library, the IT department is also providing a number of their lab workstations through the same dashboard, available to all students: 
 
 
If you need assistance for workstations other than the library workstations, you can contact the John Jay Helpdesk or CLSS for further help:  
 
CLSS email support: clsslabsupport@jjay.cuny.edu 
 
JJ Helpdesk support: helpdesk@jjay.cuny.edu or 212-237-8200 
 

Posted Sunday, January 24, 2021 - 4:21pm


Screenshot of the LibGuide

PROBLEM:  How do you wear a protective face mask yet use your voice clearly?
How do you maintain a safe social distance yet participate in shaping your community?
SOLUTION:   Vote! 

Despite the challenges of COVID, it’s easy to vote in the upcoming election. We’ve put together a brief guide with links to help you navigate.
Start by making sure you are registered to vote. The guide provides links to register to vote and/or check your registration status online.
This year, you can vote by mail with an absentee ballot. Alternatively, you can vote in-person - either early or on election day. The guide provides links to the absentee ballot application and is an easy place to find the dates and locations of in-person polling places for both early voting and Election Day voting.
In addition, we provide links to help you make informed decisions about the candidates and any ballot measures up for a vote. Our guide helps you find biographical information, policy and issue viewpoints, positions and beliefs, and who exactly is helping to finance a candidate’s campaign.
Your vote and your voice make a difference. Check out our Voting 2021 guide and vote!

 

 

By Peggy Teich


Posted Thursday, October 8, 2020 - 12:16pm


Rodrigo Hicks

Since 1998, Rodrigo Hicks shared his joyful personality, generous character and incredible work ethic with the library. He worked part-time in the evening, first in the Circulation Department then later with Interlibrary Loan. Thanks to Rodrigo’s meticulous work scanning and processing library materials, we were able to share our extensive collections with patrons around the world. Rodrigo was also responsible for processing books that arrived for our patrons and returned them to their home libraries. While he worked diligently, Rodrigo would take the time to share a word or two with colleagues and students. Our memories below illustrate how he touched many lives and brightened our days. Here, we share our fond memories of Rodrigo and pay tribute to a dear colleague. (Compiled and written by Karen Okamoto)

 


Posted Monday, July 20, 2020 - 8:57pm


This summer, all libraries in CUNY are transitioning to a new software system, Alma. We will be joining more than a thousand libraries around the world that have already adopted this state of the art end-to-end integrated library system for managing the acquisition, cataloging, circulation and sharing of resources in all formats (print, electronic, and digital). In order to ensure the smooth transition of millions of records to the new system, the CUNY libraries have to take a pause in July for processing  and cataloging any new materials and creating records. OneSearch, the discovery system that is the public face of Alma, will be still searchable but will not display any new records or updates until August 10th. Please be patient and contact us with any questions at libref@jjay.cuny.edu


Posted Wednesday, June 24, 2020 - 11:36am


View infographic as PDF

Image explaining what the in-library use survey is

Image of infographic highlighting 5 items from the survey

image summarizing key comments from the survey

 

Text description of the 2019 in-library use survey: 5 highlights

What is the in-library use survey?

Every 3 years, the John Jay College Library distributes a paper survey to those present in the Library during a one-week period in the fall. The survey seeks to gather information on how patrons use the library, what they value about the library, and ideas on how we can improve it. Here we present some highlights and key findings from our most recent survey. 

  • 1020 respondents.
  • 95% of respondents agree and strongly agree with the statement: "The library is important to my academic success."
  • 68% use the Library for quiet individual study.
  • 87% affirmed that quiet spaces for individual study are very important.
  • 72% visit 2 or more times per week.

More individual study spaces, better chairs, more electrical outlets...

These are the three most cited suggestions from respondents. We are exploring ways to address these concerns by designing better signage for quiet study areas, applying for funding to increase the number of electrical outlets and working with other campus offices to improve study areas. 

- Karen Okamoto

 


Posted Monday, April 6, 2020 - 9:43pm


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